An analysis of shylock in the merchant of venice by william shakespeare

On stage, it is Shylock who makes the play, and almost all of the great actors of the English and Continental stage have attempted the role.

An analysis of shylock in the merchant of venice by william shakespeare

Antonio — a prominent merchant of Venice in a melancholic mood. Bassanio, a young Venetian of noble rank, wishes to woo the beautiful and wealthy heiress Portia of Belmont. Having squandered his estate, he needs 3, ducats to subsidise his expenditures as a suitor.

Bassanio approaches his friend Antonioa wealthy merchant of Venice who has previously and repeatedly bailed him out.

An analysis of shylock in the merchant of venice by william shakespeare

He finally agrees to lend the sum to Bassanio without interest upon one condition: With money at hand, Bassanio leaves for Belmont with his friend Gratiano, who has asked to accompany him.

Gratiano is a likeable young man, but he is often flippant, overly talkative, and tactless. Bassanio warns his companion to exercise self-control, and the two leave for Belmont. Meanwhile, in Belmont, Portia is awash with suitors. Her father left a will stipulating each of her suitors must choose correctly from one of three caskets — one each of gold, silver and lead.

If he picks the right casket, he gets Portia.

An analysis of shylock in the merchant of venice by william shakespeare

The first suitor, the Prince of Morocco, chooses the gold casket, interpreting its slogan, "Who chooseth me shall gain what many men desire", as referring to Portia. The second suitor, the conceited Prince of Arragon, chooses the silver casket, which proclaims, "Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves", as he believes he is full of merit.

Both suitors leave empty-handed, having rejected the lead casket because of the baseness of its material and the uninviting nature of its slogan, "Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath". The last suitor is Bassanio, whom Portia wishes to succeed, having met him before.

Shylock has become more determined to exact revenge from Christians because his daughter Jessica eloped with the Christian Lorenzo and converted.

Shylock has Antonio brought before court. At Belmont, Bassanio receives a letter telling him that Antonio has been unable to repay the loan from Shylock. The climax of the play takes place in the court of the Duke of Venice.

SparkNotes: The Merchant of Venice

He demands his pound of flesh from Antonio. The Duke, wishing to save Antonio but unable to nullify a contract, refers the case to a visitor. He identifies himself as Balthazar, a young male "doctor of the law", bearing a letter of recommendation to the Duke from the learned lawyer Bellario.

The doctor is Portia in disguise, and the law clerk who accompanies her is Nerissa, also disguised as a man. As Balthazar, Portia repeatedly asks Shylock to show mercy in a famous speechadvising him that mercy "is twice blest: It blesseth him that gives and him that takes" IV, i, Shylock.

Although critics tend to agree that Shylock is The Merchant of Venice’s most noteworthy figure, no consensus has been reached on whether to read him as a bloodthirsty bogeyman, a clownish Jewish stereotype, or a tragic figure whose sense of decency has been fractured by the persecution he endures.

Certainly, Shylock is the play’s antagonist, and he is menacing enough to seriously imperil the . Shylock is the most vivid and memorable character in The Merchant of Venice, and he is one of Shakespeare's greatest dramatic plombier-nemours.com stage, it is Shylock who makes the play, and almost all of the great actors of the English and Continental stage have attempted the role.

Nov 17,  · Listen to this audiobook in full for free with a day trial: plombier-nemours.com William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice . Home» Literature» Poetry» Character Analysis of Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice” by William Shakespeare. Character Analysis of Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice” by William Shakespeare.

Posted by Nicole Smith, Dec 7, Poetry Comments Closed Print. Tweet. Send to Friend. Shylock is the antagonist and a tragic character in William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice.

A Jewish merchant living in a Christian city, he comes across as greedy, jealous and vengeful. The first law school for women in the United States, founded in , was named Portia Law School after Shakespeare's heroine in The Merchant of Venice.

The Merchant of Venice - Wikipedia